State Legislators pass bill to make California a 'sanctuary state'

State Legislators pass bill to make California a 'sanctuary state'

The California Legislature Saturday passed a "sanctuary state" bill to protect immigrants without legal residency in the USA, part of a broader push by Democrats to counter expanded deportation orders under the Trump administration.

The bill forbids local and state law enforcement officers from carrying out practices such as asking about someone's immigration status, handing a person over to federal immigration authorities if there's no warrant or establishment of probable cause and disclosing personal information about someone if it isn't already public information, according to the most recent bill analysis.

Homan says if the governor signs the legislation it will "make California communities less safe".

The Assembly's 49-25 vote sets up a vote in the Senate later Friday.

- California is one step closer to becoming a so-called Sanctuary State. Jerry Brown drastically scaled back the version first introduced, the result of negotiations between Brown and De Leon in the final weeks of the legislative session.

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The California State Assembly Friday afternoon approved a "Sanctuary State" bill that would limit police cooperation with federal immigration authorities.

But the law has backers too: San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, who simply called it "a reasonable streamlining bill", and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaff, who said in August, "We need to plan and prepare for accommodating diverse populations and more dense development in our existing footprint".

"Given their limited resources, I agree that state and local law enforcement should not be doing the jobs of federal immigration agents", said Bates.

The bill that is headed to Brown's desk allows communication with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) regarding anyone who has committed any of the 800 crimes listed in the California Trust Law, which includes some misdemeanors and non-violent crimes. Assemblyman James Gallagher, R-Yuba City, said the bill would create "only a sanctuary for criminals". The California Police Chiefs Association is now neutral on the bill, but the California State Sheriffs' Association still opposes it.

The bill's approval comes less than a day after a federal judge blocked the Trump administration's rules requiring cities to help enforce federal immigration laws in order to receive funding. The Trump administration is playing politics with public safety.

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