South Korea Readies 'Blackout Bombs' to Fight North Korea

South Korea Readies 'Blackout Bombs' to Fight North Korea

Russian Federation and China called for restraint on North Korea on Monday after U.S. President Donald Trump warned over the weekend that "only one thing will work" in dealing with Pyongyang, hinting that military action was on his mind, Reuters reports.

North Korea's nuclear weapons development is spooking most Americans, and two-thirds of them say President Donald Trump's war of words with the isolated nation's leader is making the situation worse.

South Korea's military has been in a high state of monitoring and readiness alongside the US military, South Korean media reported.

The four aircraft then flew across the peninsula and staged another round of a firing exercise over the Yellow Sea before the two B-IBs returned home, the South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) said.

A U-2S high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft has been deployed by the U.S. Air Force to monitor potential military movements by the North. The visiting ministers' itinerary will continue until Friday, when they are expected to meet with the South Korean foreign and defense ministers to further discuss a range of issues concerning bilateral cooperation and regional security.

Commenting on a Trump statement that the United States might withdraw from a nuclear deal with Iran, Peskov said such a move would have "negative consequences".

JPMorgan Q3 Earnings, Revenue Beat; Citigroup To Report
Finally, Manning & Napier Advisors LLC raised its position in shares of J P Morgan Chase & Co by 19.3% in the second quarter. Signature Est & Limited Liability has 1,851 shares. (NYSE: JPM ) has "Neutral" rating given on Monday, January 18 by UBS.

His predecessor, Barack Obama, visited Observation Post Ouellette in 2012, peering into North Korea through bulletproof glass and a pair of binoculars.

China, North Korea's main ally and trading partner, has consistently argued sanctions alone will not work, urging Washington and Pyongyang to lower their rhetoric and return to the negotiating table.

To make the complex fully operational again, North Korea would also be hard pressed to replace the electricity supply that came from South Korea, according to the Kaesong business owners. North Korea needs time and proof to believe that abandoning its nuclear programme will contribute to its own political and economic advantage.

South Korean warships including the nation's first Aegis destroyer, Sejongdaewang (L), in this file photo.

However an official with the current pro-engagement administration of President Moon Jae-in has said there is no evidence that North Korea diverted Kaesong wages to its weapons programs.

Related Articles