Female Dem says at least two current members engaged in sexual harassment

Female Dem says at least two current members engaged in sexual harassment

"In fact, there are two members of Congress, Republican and Democrat, right now who serve, who have been subject to review or have not been subject to review, but have engaged in sexual harassment", she said during her testimony.

House lawmakers on Tuesday will review the chamber's sexual harassment policies in the wake of sweeping allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment that have rocked powerful institutions and industries across the country.

Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-Va.), a member on the committee, also said she had heard of a congressman who is now serving who had exposed himself to a young female staffer. He opened the door in only a towel, invited the staffer inside, and proceeded to expose himself.

"That kind of situation, what are we doing here for women, right now, who are dealing with someone like that?"

The U.S. House of Representatives will require anti-harassment and anti-discrimination training for all members and their staffs, just hours after a hearing in which two female lawmakers spoke about incidents of sexual misconduct involving sitting members of Congress.

"At that point, he chose to expose himself".

The Senate just last week passed a resolution making sexual harassment training mandatory, not just for staffers and interns, but also for senators.

South Korea urged to invest more in Philippines
Moon says he remained neither optimistic nor pessimistic, noting the North has often made such decisions at the last minute. The Chinese prime minister said the countries' relations will continue to improve, though it may take time.

Two female lawmakers, one Republican and one Democrat, shared stories at a hearing Tuesday about male members of Congress who engaged in sexual harassment, though they declined to name them. "They want the system fixed and the perpetrators held accountable". In the wake of the allegations, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and other Republicans, including Ryan, have said Moore should step aside.

Speier sat front and center at a U.S. House hearing on sex harassment and said Congress isn't policing itself almost enough.

Bradley Byrne, R-Ala., said the current sexual harassment training, which isn't mandatory, is underutilized.

The House Administration Committee, which issues policies for congressional offices, is considering new policies on sexual harassment, including new training requirements.

One lawmaker, Republican Rodney Davis of IL, said that some female staffers in his office anxious that "some offices might take a shortcut and not hire women as a way to avoid these issues".

Speier told CNN's "New Day" earlier Tuesday that current policy dictates that individuals coming forward with harassment complaints have to go through a three-month process. After 30 days of mandatory mediation, during which the office or member is represented by House of Representatives counsel, they then have to go through a 30 day "cooling off period".

Barbara Child Wallace, the chair of the Office of Compliance's board of directors, defended the existing process, and told the committee more could be done to raise awareness of the current reporting procedures. "But mandatory training is one very important component of trying to stop this".

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