Commission rules in favor of United States lumber industry

Commission rules in favor of United States lumber industry

"Now, with a level playing field, the U.S. lumber industry.can have the chance to compete fairly", said Jason Brochu, co-chairman of the U.S. Lumber Coalition and co-president of Pleasant River Lumber Co.in Maine.

The U.S. Lumber Coalition, which filed a petition past year with the Commerce Department to open a case against Canada's softwood lumber industry, praised the decision.

"Now, with a level playing field, the US lumber industry, and the 350,000 hardworking men and women who support it, can have the chance to compete fairly", Brochu said.

"We are confident that the ITC decision will be overturned", Yurkovich said.

"Imports of underpriced, subsidized Canadian softwood lumber have hurt American mills, millworkers and rural communities in OR and across the country", Wyden said. However, the U.S. International Trade Commission did not find critical circumstances in the anti-dumping case, therefore retroactive anti-dumping duties do not apply.

We believe an independent tribunal will find that the current USA allegations against Canada are as unfounded as the ones they brought in the past", he said, adding, "We will continue to defend B.C.'s interests in the softwood lumber dispute and the 60,000 people who rely on B.C.'s forest sector for their jobs and livelihoods.

American producers allege that the Canadian industry is subsidized by the provincial and federal governments, while in the US, prices are set by the market - a situation the USA contends is unfair.

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The Canadian government, which has denied the dumping and subsidy charges, last week formally opened a case against the United States at the World Trade Organization over the Commerce Department's decision to impose the duties. Those fees are lower than fees paid on US timber, which comes largely from private land.

The U.S. locked in final tariffs on softwood lumber from Canada, ratcheting up economic pressure with a top trading partner and showing the Trump administration's determination to punish what it sees as unfairly traded imports.

In June, Canada announced $640m (C$867m; £500m) in relief for the country's lumber industry.

Any lumber agreement is expected to remain outside of a final NAFTA pact.

Trade data from the United States Department of Agriculture shows the amount of Canadian softwood imported fell eight per cent for first nine months of 2017, compared with the same period in 2016.

More than 95 percent of all imported lumber came from Canada previous year.

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