Sri Lanka joins Commonwealth alliance to fight against plastic pollution

Sri Lanka joins Commonwealth alliance to fight against plastic pollution

New Zealand, Sri Lanka, Vanuatu, and Ghana have already joined the United Kingdom in the Commonwealth Clean Oceans Alliance.

Prime Minister Theresa May has announced a £61.4 million package of waste funding which will help countries across the Commonwealth stop plastic waste from entering the oceans.

"We are joining forces with our Commonwealth partners, bringing together global expertise to stop plastics waste from entering oceans - and by matching pound-for-pound the United Kingdom public's passionate response to the issue, we can make our shared ambition for clean oceans a reality".

The CCOA has been jointly set up by the United Kingdom and Vanuatu to drive action on plastic waste.

Penny Mordaunt, International Development Secretary, commented: "The scourge of plastics is a global environmental challenge, and one that overwhelmingly impacts the livelihoods and health of the world's poorest people".

She said: "As one of the most significant environmental challenges facing the world today, it is vital that we tackle this issue so that future generations can enjoy a natural environment that is healthier than we now find it".

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The organisations will also host a series of events to engage industry leaders, corporations, institutions and foundations focused on the issue of marine plastic pollution.

"We are joining forces with our Commonwealth partners, bringing together global expertise to stop plastics waste from entering oceans - and by matching pound-for-pound the United Kingdom public's passionate response to the issue, we can make our shared ambition for clean oceans a reality".

Chief Executive of the Diamond Light Source, Professor Andrew Harrison, said: "With input from five institutions in three different countries, this research is a fine example of how worldwide collaboration can help make significant scientific breakthroughs".

According to conservation group WWF-UK, the group has pledged to ban microbeads in cosmetics and personal care products, as well as to cut plastic bag use, by 2021.

The DFID will also support research into solutions to reduce manufacturing pollution, and carry out waste management pilot programs to help tackle the waste from cities that too often ends up in the world's oceans and rivers.

The NREL underscored the urgency of the work, pointing out that 8 million metric tons of plastic waste, including PET bottles, enter the oceans each year, creating huge man-made islands of garbage.

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