4 more deaths linked to romaine lettuce, 2 in Minnesota

Tainted romaine lettuce is being blamed for four more deaths, bringing the total to five deaths related to a strain of E. coli, say federal health officials. Health officials said there are now 197 cases across 35 states.

Health officials have tied the E. coli outbreak, the largest in a decade, to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona. Since lettuce has a 21-day shelf life, it is unlikely that any romaine lettuce from the area remains in restaurants, stores or people's homes, the CDC said.

Still, the CDC warns that iIllnesses that occurred after May 6, 2018 might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. On Friday, health officials said they had learned of four more - one in Arkansas, one in NY, and two in Minnesota.

Four more deaths were reported from Arkansas (1), Minnesota (2), and NY (1). On Friday, health officials said they had learned of four more - one in Arkansas, one in NY, and two in Minnesota.

Many patients in this outbreak became so ill that they needed to be hospitalized, including 26 who developed a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome.

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Numerous new cases were people who became ill two to three weeks ago, when contaminated lettuce was still being sold.

Romaine lettuce grown in the Arizona region was last harvested in mid-April. Gottlieb is Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Ostroff is FDA's Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine.

Most new cases involve people who became sick two or three weeks ago, when the tainted lettuce was still available for sale.

According to the latest statement from the CDC, numerous people affected fell ill two to three weeks ago, when the contaminated lettuce was still on shop shelves.

Those infected with E. coli typically experience severe stomach cramps, diarrhea and vomiting.

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