Livin’ la vida mocha: Coffee has life lengthening properties, study suggests

Livin’ la vida mocha: Coffee has life lengthening properties, study suggests

No matter the cause of death, drinking coffee was associated with longer life expectancy for all participants, aged between 38-73 years. Indeed, only a fraction of the people in the study reported drinking 8 or more cups of coffee a day, she added - about 10,000 of the 500,000 participants. This correlation was found in individuals who drank one cup of coffee to as many as eight per day. "These results provide further evidence that coffee drinking can be part of a healthy diet and may provide reassurance to those who drink coffee and enjoy it". The study looked at some common gene variations that help determine whether someone metabolizes caffeine quickly or slowly, but didn't find any difference in health risk.

We're not saying you should drink a giant cup of scalding coffee after a workout instead of water or gatorade, but you can't put all the dehydration blame on your morning grande latte.

Years ago, health concerns about coffee included fears that it might raise risk of pancreatic cancer and other diseases.

She said: "In this large study of almost 500,000 people in the United Kingdom, coffee drinking was inversely associated with all-cause mortality, with statistically significant inverse associations observed in participants drinking 1 to 8 or more cups per day".

No doubt more coffee studies will be along in the very near future. During the study's 10-year follow-up period, around 14,200 of those people died. New research shows it may boost chances for a longer life, even for those who down at least eight cups a day.

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"Although these findings may reassure coffee drinkers, these results are from an observational study and should be interpreted cautiously", said lead study author Erikka Loftfield, a research fellow at the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Go ahead and have that cup of coffee, maybe even several more. But it turns out that even slow caffeine metabolizers seem to share the death-risk-reduction connected to coffee drinking.

The research did not include whether participants drank coffee black or with cream and sugar.

In many studies, it hasn't mattered whether coffee was caffeinated or not, which indicates that many benefits may not be connected to caffeine - there are all kinds of other antioxidant-rich compounds in coffee that could have an effect. The inverse association held for both ground and instant coffee, as well as decaffeinated coffee. While the study represents an median view of coffee drinking habits, it is encouraging reading for lovers of the toasted bean.

Other research has indicated that coffee drinkers are less likely to develop various forms of cancer, Type 2 diabetes, depression, Alzheimer's, dementia, liver cirrhosis, and heart disease. So the next time someone says they're trying to limit their coffee consumption, you can tell them not to worry about it.

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