Starbucks To Eliminate Plastic Straws In Its Stores By 2020

Starbucks To Eliminate Plastic Straws In Its Stores By 2020

Starbucks is to ban plastic straws from all of of its stores by 2020, amounting to the elimination of more than one billion plastic straws each year. In May, the European Union also suggested a ban on some plastic items, including straws.

In a move meant to cut back on waste, the worldwide coffee giant said Monday that it would eliminate plastic straws from its more than 28,000 locations globally by 2020.

The global coffee giant said that it plans to eliminate all single-use plastic straws by 2020, and will instead cap cold drinks with lids that do not require the use of a straw.

Vancouver will be the first Canadian city to have the new lids, starting in the fall of this year. The company already offers alternative straws in Seattle. Plastic straws have become one of the biggest targets. Similar proposals are being considered elsewhere, including NY and San Francisco.

Other communities across the country, including Sanibel Island, located in Florida, are also on the list of places considering a ban on these plastic products.

Other cities, like Fort Meyers, have banned plastic straws as well.

Robin Wright Opens Up About Kevin Spacey Sexual Harassment Allegations
In the final moments of season 5, Claire turned to the camera to break the fourth wall for the first time in the series. Spacey will not be returning for the sixth season after allegations of sexual misconduct surfaced in late October.

The strawless lid, which features a raised lip, is already available in more than 8,000 stores in the USA and Canada for select beverages.

The issue is coming up in company boardrooms, though Starbucks is taking the lead.

Those straws will be provided for blended Frappuccino beverages, or by special request, the company said.

The announcement from McDonald's followed an April proposal by the United Kingdom government to ban plastic straws in the country.

The UK government said that 1 million birds and more than 100,000 sea mammals die each year from eating and getting tangled in plastic waste.

Related Articles