Brett Kavanaugh Announced as Trump's Pick for SCOTUS

Brett Kavanaugh Announced as Trump's Pick for SCOTUS

Trump is scheduled to announce his nomination to replace Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy at 9 p.m. on July 9.

Some social conservatives have anxious that Judge Kavanaugh, if he reaches the high court, would follow in the footsteps of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who is viewed as being among the more moderate of Republican-appointed justices. "The stakes are simply too high for anything less". He called Kavanaugh a "brilliant jurist" who has "devoted his life to public service". This is one reason that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., reportedly tried to nudge POTUS away from naming him.

With Mr. Trump's campaign under investigation for suspected collusion with Russian officials during the 2016 campaign season, the progressive Alliance for Justice argues that Judge Kavanaugh would not stand up to the commander in chief, citing his 2009 article.

"My judicial philosophy is straightforward", Kavanaugh said.

President Trump announces his Supreme Court nominee.

A judge more conservative than Kennedy could vote to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 court decision establishing a woman's right to abortion. As a result, Democrats have accused Republicans of stealing a Supreme Court seat.

The pressure will be most intense on Sens. Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Doug Jones of Alabama, Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Dianne Feinstein of California.

Another Democrat, Senator Richard Blumenthal, on Sunday assailed Trump's reliance on a list of potential nominees endorsed by the conservative Federalist Society.

The president's announcement came with fanfare in the east room of the White House with Trump's wife, Melania, Vice-President Mike Pence and several senators in attendance.

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"This is a nightmare for red-state Democrats to oppose a highly qualified nominee, and all four of these people are highly qualified, been on the court, know what they're doing, mainstream judges", Graham said.

The Times also reported that McConnell did not "want to draw the ire" of Paul over Kavanaugh's role in crafting Bush-era policies.

Analysts say that could have weighed in his favour with the White House, given that the Supreme Court may at some point be asked to rule on matters arising from Special Counsel Robert Mueller's ongoing Russia-related investigation. It's been decided by the Supreme Court.

Presidents weigh all sorts of considerations in deciding on a Supreme Court nominee, often beginning with the big question: Will the choice be confirmed by the Senate? "But I'm getting very close to making a final decision". "It should and must take place again now". Those who promote a woman's right to choose an abortion were upset with a Kavanaugh ruling against an immigrant teenager in federal custody who sought an immediate abortion.

Kavanaugh, 53, is likely to sit on the bench for decades and make crucial decisions on issues of abortion, gay rights, gun rights, healthcare and immigration.

Anti-abortion-rights activists do not disagree. Kavanaugh now reportedly believes court proceedings against a sitting president should be deferred until after he or she is out of office. John McCain's prolonged absence, Kavanaugh's confirmation is anything but a slam dunk.

The White House did announce its "sherpa" for the eventual selection: Former Sen. Jon Kyl would guide Trump's nominee through the grueling Senate process.

The executive editor of the Lawfare blog, Susan Hennessey, who is also a Brookings fellow in national security in governance studies, called it "completely freakish that the president has imposed an artificial, TV ratings-driven deadline on such a consequential choice". Once that is done and Kavanaugh has completed a questionnaire from the Judiciary Committee, formal hearings can begin.

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