Trump to Appoint Extreme Ideologue to the Supreme Court

Trump to Appoint Extreme Ideologue to the Supreme Court

In the case decided Monday that had to do with attorneys' fees, there would be no majority if Kavanaugh were to withdraw.

President Donald Trump will announce his Supreme Court nominee tonight at 9 p.m. EDT.

All three states lean heavily Republican.

Outside adviser Leonard Leo, now on leave from the Federalist Society, said on ABC's "This Week" on Sunday that this kind of jockeying is standard, noting that "every potential nominee before announcement gets concerns expressed about them by people who might ultimately support them". Dianne Feinstein (Calif.), received an invitation from the White House on Monday afternoon.

Trump has been uncharacteristically circumspect about what he is thinking as the process has unfolded.

Republicans and Democrats are gearing up for a combative confirmation process, as Republicans hold a slim majority in the Senate and liberals express fear that Trump's pick could join the conservatives on the court to someday overturn the Roe v. Wade decision.

"I'm getting very close to making a final decision", Trump said, adding that he would "probably" have a decision by Sunday evening or Monday morning.

The Times says Trump has recently been asking associates about Hardiman, and has also been talking about Barrett and Kavanaugh. So it's likely not a coincidence that Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is trying to get the court nominee confirmed before the elections.

With little warning, the Republican administration announced it is freezing payments under an "Obamacare" program that protects insurers with sicker patients from financial losses. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., would guide the nominee through the confirmation process, including preparing the nominee for meetings with senators.

Officially, the White House hasn't indicated a preferred candidate and isn't expected to give away many clues until the announcement.

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"If all the Republicans stick together", Chris Coons, a Democratic senator on the Senate Judiciary Committee told CBS's "Face the Nation" on Sunday, "they will be able to confirm whomever President Trump nominates".

Trump's selection will set up a confirmation showdown in the U.S. Senate, where his fellow Republicans hold a slim 51-49 majority, though with ailing Senator John McCain battling cancer in his home state of Arizona they now can muster only 50 votes.

Former New Hampshire Sen.

Barrett also clerked for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

The most significant and far-reaching damage Trump will do to our environment and public health will come from his Supreme Court picks.

Kavanaugh, 53, on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, is a favorite of the conservative legal establishment because of his long record on issues ranging from the separation of powers and executive privilege to abortion, immigration and gun rights. The race is not expected to be competitive.

Interested in Donald Trump? Leonard Leo, the vice president of the conservative Federalist Society who selected Trump's longlist of 25 candidates for the supreme court, told ABC's This Week that warnings about Roe v Wade were a "scare tactic".

The campaign will include a biographical ad about the nominee. The president has spent the days leading up to his announcement discussing the pros and cons of various contenders with aides and allies. The new ad brings their total investment to $2.4 million.

While Trump has already made one pick for the high court since he became president in January 2017, the vacancy left by the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, announced late last month, has weightier implications.

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