Supreme Court nominee Kavanaugh reports relatively modest finances

Supreme Court nominee Kavanaugh reports relatively modest finances

President Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh, would be the fourth graduate of Yale Law School on the bench, but a group of Yale Law students and alumni say "people will die if he is confirmed".

Just a day after reports surfaced that Donald Trump and retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy made a secret deal to secure Kennedy's retirement by picking former Kennedy law clerk Brett Kavanaugh to take the vacant seat on the court, as the Inquisitr reported, Kavanaugh's financial disclosure forms revealed that the prospective high court justice ran up somewhere between $60,000 and $200,000 in credit card debt as well as a bank loan by the end of 2016 - debt that took about a decade to accumulate but somehow disappeared in 2017, after Trump took office. He reported between $60,000 to $200,000 in debt among three credit cards and a loan in 2006, the same year he was confirmed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

Kavanaugh, known to be a baseball fan, was paid back by his friends and retired the debt in 2017. "Each credit card had between "$15,000 and $50,000 in debt, and a Thrift Savings Plan loan was between $15,000 and $50,000".

The financial site MarketWatch noted that according to his listed assets, Kavanaugh will become, if he is confirmed, the only member of the Supreme Court who is not a millionaire, leading the site to ask, "Brett Kavanaugh has saved nearly nothing - so does he actually understand business?"

The forms show in 2016 he accrued a credit card bill between $45,000 and $150,000 that was spent on home improvements and Washington Nationals season tickets for himself and some friends.

The report noted that Shah did not provide the friends' names, nor additional details about the tickets.

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"He did not carry that kind of debt year over year", Shah said.

- "Purchasing season tickets to watch the chronically disappointing Washington Nationals play baseball in their charmless stadium year after year", Deadspin deadpanned "is a troubling sign of poor judgment". The value of residences is not subject to disclosure, and Shah added that Kavanaugh has a government retirement account worth almost half a million dollars that also was not required to be disclosed.

Unlike some of the other justices, Kavanaugh has worked more than two decades in the public sector and has not built wealth as a private lawyer. And while it won't get Kavanaugh an intentional walk from Senate Democrats, they might want to consider how Kavanaugh compares to their own records before putting a few pitches under his chin.

'Judge Kavanaugh is a brilliant jurist who has dedicated his life to public service, ' Shah said. The justice with the highest reported assets was Stephen Breyer, who listed between $6.4 million and $16.6 million.

Pausing in his pursuit of Supreme Court robes, nominee Brett Kavanaugh donned a blue apron Wednesday afternoon to help serve meals to the homeless.

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