Trump to propose blocking California’s clean auto standards

Trump to propose blocking California’s clean auto standards

The EPA and the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are reportedly backing the proposal, each agency providing its own remedy to strip California of its authority. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said that he is "ready to use every legal tool at our disposal to protect the current vehicle emission standards". While they spent the first year of the Trump administration attacking Obama's rules as too costly, they fear the regulatory uncertainty that a years-long court battle over a rollback would create.

"These were issues that were resolved 9 years ago, and it's nearly like picking at a scab that healed long ago and reopening it, only to cause the automakers a lot of bleeding, " said Simon Mui, a senior scientist and clean vehicles specialist at the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental group.

The increases were initially set up by a collaboration between California and former President Barack Obama's regulators as a way to address climate change.

But if California and the 12 other states and the District of Columbia retain their own emission rules, vehicle makers would have to either market two different sets of cars or sell California-compliant cars nationwide.

The administration also contends the new rule would reduce "societal costs" by about $500 billion over the life of the vehicles but the administration's overall forecast net benefits are unclear, once higher fuel consumption is taken into account. The office of Gov.

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Pictures and videos posted on Twitter and Chinese social media showed smoke filling an intersection as people gathered. It has not been confirmed whether this was related to the reported explosion.

Messages seeking comment from OMB, NHTSA and the EPA were not immediately returned. Meanwhile, California has announced that the state plans to take legal action to fight the intrusion into their state politics.

In 2002, the state imposed on the automakers new standards for how much greenhouse gases their cars could produce, with the requirements growing tougher over time.

The proposed regulations revamp will also stop the current federal rules aiming to boost fuel efficiency into the next decade.

The issue is complicated by the fact that California is not alone in its pursuit of more stringent emissions standards. He has written extensively about administrative and environmental law. The automakers say the California Air Resources Board rules for vehicle model years 2022-2025 are onerous and impractical, despite a CARB analysis in 2017 concluding that the standards are technologically feasible. By 2025, the standards call for a fleet-wide average mileage, for cars and light trucks, of more than 50 miles per gallon (although the actual average would be lower, due to credits and loopholes). "They're on legally shaky ground, here". The state is in the midst of hitting aggressive goals as part of a plan approved a year ago to cut emissions in the state by 40 percent from 1990 levels by 2030. And yet, the state's emissions from transportation have been rising, due to a strong economy, relatively cheap fuel, and consumers' preference for SUVs over small cars or electric vehicles.

"We don't want to see two different standards for the country", Wheeler said.

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