International Space Station Captures Remarkable Size of Hurricane Florence

International Space Station Captures Remarkable Size of Hurricane Florence

Hurricane Florence will be the first Category 4 storm to make a direct hit on North Carolina in more than 50 years and with sustained winds of 130mph, it's already pushing a storm surge and rain ahead of it.

The massive storm was captured on a high-definition camera from the International Space Station as it barreled across the Atlantic Ocean with its 130 miles per hour winds.

"Ever stared down the gaping glance of a category Four typhoon?"

NASA called the footage "a stark and sobering view" of the storm.

"It's chilling, even from space", European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst said in a tweet on Wednesday.

Astronaut Ricky Arnold, onboard the International Space Station, captured the hurricane churning in the Atlantic as it morphed into a monster storm. No matter what track it takes, Hurricane Florence will be weakening before it reaches New Jersey; however, Rowan is in for a week of gray skies and continued rainfall.

State braces for major hurricane
North Carolina should brace for three dangers from Florence, Cooper said: coastal ocean surges, strong winds and flooding. The storm has 115 mph winds and is located 580 miles south-southeast of Bermuda and is moving west at 13 mph.

A camera aboard the International Space Station recorded video of Hurricane Florence on Wednesday morning, when it was about 500 miles offshore.

An image taken by NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold of Hurricane Florence in the Atlantic Ocean, approaching the Carolinas on September 12, 2018.

Florence is expected to remain a Category 4 storm when it makes landfall.

When the space station flew over the storm's menacing eye, Gerst took this photo.

The governors of North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia have all issued mandatory evacuation orders for the coastal communities that are in the storm's bull's eye.

Those warily watching Florence have compared it to Hurricanes Fran and Hugo, which pummeled North Carolina and SC, respectively, more than two decades ago.

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