Cumbria braced for Storm Helene which could cause 'danger to life'

Cumbria braced for Storm Helene which could cause 'danger to life'

A similar section of Wales and the Cornish peninsular are also expected to bear the brunt of any storm-like weather, although much of the rest of England could be noticeably windier by the time Helene hits land on Tuesday morning.

A Met Office statement said: "A spell of strong winds for western and some central parts of the United Kingdom during Monday night and Tuesday morning".

- Some damage to trees is possible, for example large branches or trees falling in a few places.

Some bus and train services affected, with some journeys taking longer.

- There could be some short term loss of power and other services.

But the majority of Helene's strong winds are now predicted to spend themselves over the Irish Sea from tonight and into Tuesday morning.

A status yellow rain warning for Galway and Mayo will come into effect at midday today with a risk of flooding in parts of the west of Ireland.

Watch Hurricane Florence Make Landfall in This Incredible Space Station Video
In Washington, North Carolina, the wind-swept Pamlico River has risen beyond its banks and is flooding entire neighborhoods. That's enough to fill the Chesapeake Bay or cover the entire state of Texas with almost 4 inches of water, he calculated.

Rain clearing for some parts of country this afternoon but further heavy rain along western coastal counties.

Remnants of former hurricane Helene will hit the United Kingdom next week - bringing strong winds and warmer weather.

Met Eireann has said that it will continue to monitor the situation surrounding the landing of ex-tropical Storm Helene, which is expected to hit Ireland early next week.

Met Office forecasters have warned that injuries and danger to life are a possibility.

Met Office meteorologist Alan Deakin said: "Hurricane Helene may influence things in combination with an area of low pressure over the coming days".

Heavy rain is also likely across sections of Northern Ireland, northern England and Scotland, as well as winds of up to 60 miles per hour.

Related Articles