'Drunk birds' flying into windows, cars in northern Minnesota

'Drunk birds' flying into windows, cars in northern Minnesota

This, in turn, has led to unorthodox behavior from these winged residents: flying lower than usual, crashing into cars and windows, and losing their balance. That, plus many birds having yet to migrate south, means that more of them are feeling the effects of the alcohol in the berries than in past years.

"It appears that some birds are getting a little more "tipsy" than normal", the statement read.

Officers said younger birds could not handle toxins "as efficiently as more mature birds" before reassuring concerned residents there was no need to panic and that the animals would eventually sober up.

The Gilbert Police Department put out a press release this week stating they are well aware of the birds that appear to be "under the influence" and there's no need for alarm.

"Oh my! That explains all the birds bouncing off of my window lately", Cassie Polla commented.

Image: The birds are said to be "confused". They've just had a few too many - a few too many overripe berries, that is.

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Somebody needs to cut off the birds of Gilbert, Minnesota, because they're all drunk.

Species like robins, thrushes and waxwings, which tend to eat more berries than their other feathered friends, are most likely to get buzzed as they gorge themselves on alcoholic fruits while trying to bulk up for winter. "They have actually fallen out of trees on occasion". Woodstock pushing Snoopy off a dog house for no apparent reason.

Police Chief Ty Techar wrote in the statement that the cause of the birds "flying under the influence" was down to the early fermentation of berries in the area. And it's pretty common, reports NPR, which dug up some other instances of boozey birds.

In Portland, Oregon, the Audubon Society operates what's essentially a drunk tank for birds.

Authorities expect they will sober up some time in the near future.

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