Jamal Khashoggi disappearance: Last column published

Jamal Khashoggi disappearance: Last column published

The United States received a payment of $100 million from Saudi Arabia on Tuesday, the same day Secretary of State Mike Pompeo arrived in Riyadh to discuss the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a State Department official confirmed Wednesday amid global calls for answers in the case.

On Wednesday afternoon, Turkish investigators entered the Saudi consul's residence, about 200m (650ft) from the consulate.

Major sponsors have been pulling out for the past week since Mr Khashoggi entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul and never emerged.

This video grab made on October 10, 2018, from CCTV footage obtained from Turkish news agency DHA, shows Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, right, arriving at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on October 2, 2018.

USA officials say they are taking Khashoggi's disappearance seriously, but Trump says he has not sent the Federal Bureau of Investigation, stressing that he was not "American citizen".

Mr Khashoggi is a United States resident and columnist for the Washington Post newspaper who went into self-imposed exile previous year after reportedly being warned by Saudi officials to stop criticising the crown prince's policies.

Turkish forensic officers arrive at the Saudi consulate to conduct a new search over the disappearance and alleged slaying of Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi, in Istanbul.

"The Arab world is facing its own version of an Iron Curtain, imposed not by external actors but through domestic forces vying for power", Mr Khashoggi wrote.

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"This guy has got to go", Senator Lindsey Graham told Fox. He wrote for The Washington Post after leaving Saudi Arabia. In the column, Khashoggi laments that Tunisia is the only country in the Arab world that was classified in a recent report as "free" (in terms of everything from the press to elections).

The newspaper said it gathered more information about the suspects through facial recognition software, a database of Saudi cellphone numbers, leaked Saudi government documents, witnesses and media.

However, they have not presented any evidence to corroborate their claim and say that video cameras at the consulate were not recording at the time.

Reports in Turkish media give gruesome details of what are said to be his final minutes.

Riyadh insists that he left the consulate safely. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who also met with Pompeo, said there was evidence that some materials had been freshly painted.

Reports suggest he was killed on the orders of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in retaliation for critical journalism in the Washington Post - a claim the Saudi regime denies.

Khashoggi in the past said he always considered himself a patriot, viewing his criticism of the Saudi government as a sign of his love for Saudi Arabia and a desire for conditions there to improve.

A joint-probe into the case by Saudi Arabia and Turkey is ongoing.

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