Doctors Eat And Poop Lego In The Name Of Science

Doctors Eat And Poop Lego In The Name Of Science

A half dozen pediatricians chose to see what affect, if any, a tiny yellow Lego head would have on their own bodies by volunteering to swallow them. A higher SHAT score meant that the participant had more frequent and looser bowel movements, which could affect how fast the Lego head was you-know-what out of the person.

Published in the Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health (yes, seriously), the painstaking dookie review was undertaken by scientists Andrew Tagg, Damian Roland, Grace Leo, Henry Goldstein and Tessa Davis.

Once recovered from a participant's stool, a Found and Retrieved Time (FART) score was recorded. Scientists swallow toy heads to solve burning question Six curious scientists have answered a freaky call of doodie to explore how long it takes for a piece of Lego, the children's toy, to complete its wonderful journey through the body once it's been swallowed.

The study involved six doctors associated with the pediatric medical blog Don't Forget the Bubbles.

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In comic fashion, they ranked the softness of their stool samples on a scale they called the Stool Hardness and Transit (SHAT) scale.

So, what did they find?

How long it takes for the Lego head to come out the other end was measured on the Found and Retrieved Time (FART) score, and the average among the small group was 1.7 days. Presumably, this is referring to the fact that one male volunteer never found a Lego head. "This will be of use to anxious parents who may worry that transit times may be prolonged and potentially painful for their children".

"This will reassure parents, and the authors advocate that no parent should be expected to search through their child's feces to prove object retrieval". The study was extremely small and limited, but, according to Forbes, "does offer some reassurance to parents and anyone who needs a Lego head to complete a body that such a small toy part will be pooped out without complications, typically in 1 to 3 days".

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