Facebook's secret documents seized by Parliament are published by MPs

Facebook's secret documents seized by Parliament are published by MPs

The defunct app developer obtained them as part of its ongoing lawsuit in California state court alleging that Facebook violated promises to developers.

A United Kingdom parliamentary committee released a series of documents today which reveal, among other things, that Facebook knew triggering an Android permissions dialog during an app update that would collect SMS and call logs would lead to "bad PR" and allegedly attempted to circumvent the process in order to make it hard for Android users to discover the new behavior.

"Facebook have clearly entered into whitelisting agreements with certain companies, which meant that after the platform changes in 2014/15 they maintained full access to friends Data", Collins wrote in the report. This includes that Facebook tried to hide from Android phone users that it was collecting data about their calls and texts in case it turned into a PR problem.

In the summary of findings, Damian Collins, chairman of the British Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee that investigated Facebook over the Cambridge Analytica data scandal earlier this year, promptly calls out the social network's data privacy practices.

The documents show an exchange between Zuckerberg and senior executive Justin Osofsky in 2013, in which they chose to stop giving friends' data access to Vine on the day that social media rival Twitter launched the video-sharing service.

Collins notes that a recurring theme in the 250-page cache of documents is that Facebook pushed the "idea of linking access to friends data to the financial value of the developers' relationship with Facebook".

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But the emails suggest that Facebook followed a set policy of selling the information to a select group of major app developers even after the platform changes were fully deployed in 2015.

Facebook used data provided by the Israeli analytics firm Onavo to determine which other mobile apps were being downloaded and used by the public.

"Yup, go for it", Zuckerberg responded.

Facebook said in a statement released to AFP that the Six4Three emails "are only part of the story and are presented in a way that is very misleading without additional context".

Fox News has reached out to Airbnb, Lyft and Netflix with requests for comment.

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