At least three killed in Zimbabwe fuel protests

At least three killed in Zimbabwe fuel protests

The government has vowed it "will not hesitate to take action" against protesters who threaten to destabilise the country and the military was deployed to assist police.

For a second day residents in the suburb of Epworth in the capital are back on the streets and businesses remain shut in the capital and Bulawayo, the BBC's Shinagi Nyoka in Harare reports.

Industries in Zimbabwe have been denied access to foreign currency since October and companies have been forced to source dollars illegally on the black market, the CZI said in a letter to government.

However, the long lines of frustrated motorists illustrate the growing severity of a shortage of United States dollars, the currency Zimbabwe adopted after abandoning its own hyperinflation-ravaged Zimdollar in 2009, while everyday life is getting increasingly tough with rising prices of basic goods and erosion of salaries, which have remained static.

Sekai Nzenza said by phone that the allowance will be issued from January to March while negotiations with unions continue.

The action came shortly after junior doctors ended a 40-day strike demanding salaries in United States dollars and better working conditions.

Meanwhile, the Police have fired live ammunition and teargas during running battles with groups of young people trying to enforce a nationwide shutdown to protest against the rising cost of living. This is Zimbabwe's biggest unrest since deadly post-election violence in August.

TRT World's John Nyashanu has more from Harare.

The government says it is aware that prices have been rising, forcing many people to slide into poverty.

Israel locates Hezbollah tunnel on Lebanon border
It said it holds the Lebanese government responsible for everything happening in its territory. He added that Hezbollah retained underground facilities on the Lebanese side.

Social media platforms, including Facebook and WhatsApp, have been blocked and businesses have closed. "Workers' salaries have been reduced to nothing and our suffering elevated to another level", it said.

Both petrol and diesel prices have doubled, from R19 a litre to a whopping R45 a litre.

That means gasoline in Zimbabwe is now the most expensive in the world, based on data from GlobalPetrolPrices.com.

In rand terms or USA dollar terms, the fuel price has not gone up as one still needs R43 or US$1.31 to buy a litre of petrol.

The Zimbabwe Association of Doctors for Human Rights said 13 people had sustained gunshot wounds in and around Harare on Monday.

The protests are coming two days after Emmerson Mnangagwa, President of Zimbabwe, announced a 150 per cent increase in the price of fuel.

Political activist, Vimbaishe Musvaburi, witnessed the protests in Bulawayo which come a little more than a year after President Emmerson Mnangagwa took power.

President Mnangagwa is taking a round trip at a time when Zimbabwe is burning with protestors burning buildings and looting shops all over the country.

The state visit to Russian Federation is the first stop in Mnangagwa's four-nation tour of Eurasia, after which he will head to Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum.

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