Christchurch shooting suspect appears in New Zealand court

Christchurch shooting suspect appears in New Zealand court

New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said that the country's firearms regulations would change following the violent attacks on two mosques in the city of Christchurch.

The massacre left 41 at the Al Noor Mosque dead before the suspect journeyed to the Linwood Avenue Mosque where he killed another seven victims, one more later died in hospital. They include a 28-year-old man who was charged with murder and was due to appear in court Saturday. He was wearing a tunic and was handcuffed. Tarrant did not apply for bail, and per ABC News reports, did not apply to have his name suppressed.

He was remanded in custody and is set to reappear in court April 5. He was likely to face further charges, police said.

New Zealand's Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, said the gunman meant to continue his attack if he hadn't been stopped. The attack was the worst ever peacetime mass killing in New Zealand and the country raised its security threat level to the highest.

"I have asked our agencies this morning to work swiftly on assessing whether there was any activity on social media or otherwise, that should have triggered a response".

The gunman had posted a jumbled, 74-page manifesto on social media in which he identified himself as an Australian and white supremacist who was out to avenge attacks in Europe perpetrated by Muslims. Roma, African, Indian, Turkish, Semitic or other.

Grafton residents who knew Tarrant as a resident have told 9News they remember him as a "relatively normal" person who worked at a local gym.

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People gather at a memorial to pay tribute to victims of the mosque attacks outside Masjid Al Noor in Christchurch, New Zealand, March 16, 2019. Worshippers, possibly dead or wounded, lay on the floor, the video showed.

Ardern said the suspect traveled around the world and was in New Zealand sporadically. Two other armed suspects were last night being held in custody. The Bangladesh team was on its way to the mosque, one of two sites of the shooting attack that killed at least 49 people. Flanked by two police officers, he smirked when media persons photographed him during the hearing and was seen making the white power gesture. She said the main perpetrator used five weapons during his rampage, including two semi-automatic weapons and two shotguns, which he was legally licensed to own.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, after meeting families of Christchurch terror attacks' victims, says the country stands united and grief and that their gun laws will change in the aftermath of the attack on Christchurch mosques. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going.

A short distance away, 39 people were being treated in hospital for gunshot wounds and other injuries inflicted in the massacre. Funerals were planned on Saturday for some of the victims, several of whom were born overseas.

Although shops were shuttered and many made a decision to stay at home, Christchurch residents piled bouquets of flowers at a makeshift memorial near the Al Noor mosque, many accompanied with handwritten letters laden with sadness and disbelief.

Dozens of people laid flowers at cordons near both mosques in Christchurch, which is still rebuilding after a devastating natural disaster in 2011 that killed nearly 200 people.

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